Ribs

Precooking Ribs Before Grilling

June 18, 2019

To make delicious grilled baby back or spare ribs bake them a day or two in advance. Precooking ribs tenderizes the meat and shortens cooking time. Leave them in the refrigerator for a day or two after precooking them and the flavor develops even further.

Remove ribs from refrigerator 1 hour before cooking and let sit at room temperature.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Season ribs on both sides with kosher salt or a favorite spice rub.

Wrap each rack in 2 layers of foil.

Place ribs in roasting pan. Place in oven and bake 2 hours for baby back ribs or 3 hours for spare ribs (until tender).

Remove from oven and let cool to room temperature. Place in refrigerator for 30 minutes and up to 3 days.

Finish ribs by cooking them 7 to 10 minutes on grill heated to medium. Baste ribs frequently with your favorite sauce.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Marinate In The Morning

June 13, 2017

It’s so easy, but takes a tad bit of planning. Just pop meat in a heavy-duty resealable bag with your favorite marinade in the morning, refrigerate, and later in the day all you have to do is throw flavorful meat on the grill. You’ll be so impressed with yourself that you’ll feel like giving yourself a gold star! Make sure to place the bag in a bowl in the fridge to be safe. Sometimes, when I’m particularly crunched for time, I use classic Italian dressing as my go-to marinade.

Five Things To Marinate In Classic Italian Dressing
Flank Steak
Chicken Breasts
Butterflied Leg Of Lamb
Boneless Beef Short Ribs
Most Anything On A Skewer

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Cooking With Coffee

February 23, 2017

There’s nothing like the smell of freshly brewed morning coffee whether it’s perked, dripped or pressed, it’s the most favorite part of my day. Coffee is my morning ritual, but coffee is not just for mornings. If you have a bit of extra brewed coffee or grounds lying around then you can “perk” up the flavor of pretty much anything. The earthy flavor works in everything from meat marinades, sweet syrups, and many savory and sweet recipes using coffee as an ingredient, from tangy sauces for a tender filet mignon to a few teaspoons flavoring your favorite cakes or cookies. When added to a chocolate cake or a cookie, coffee brings out the flavor especially in chocolate. When the recipe calls for water just use what’s leftover in the pot. In many recipes you can just add a teaspoon of instant coffee or even espresso powder.

Add flavor fast to a roast by using that leftover coffee in your marinade, which also helps tenderize the meat. You can also use it to the braising liquid for beef short ribs. As the liquid cooks down, the coffee caramelized adds a delicious bittersweet dimension to the dish. I also like to stir a bit of coffee into barbecue sauce for grilled chicken or add some to homemade chili to round out the flavor.

Add coffee grounds to your spice shelf! The combination of ground coffee, kosher salt, and paprika will add flavor to your dishes. Use it to make a crusted pork or brisket dish. Rub the coffee ground spice combination to burgers before grilling them.

I like using instant espresso powder in my desserts. Unlike coffee grounds, espresso powder dissolves completely in hot water, eliminating grittiness that you may not want in most baked goods. Keep in mind that it packs a powerful punch, so a little goes a long way. Add a small amount to brownies or cakes. Freeze it with sugar for an easy granita or reduce it with sugar and cream to create a rich glaze.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Black Garlic

April 12, 2016

Black Garlic

Black Garlic has been around for quite awhile and is an ingredient that chefs have been using across the country. Think of it as “sweet meets savory.” Black garlic is made when heads of garlic are aged under very specialized conditions until the cloves turn black and have a sticky date-like texture. The taste is delicious and unique with a sweet and earthy umami flavor that intensifies nearly any dish you’re creating.

Garlic bulbs are kept for weeks at low temperatures in a humid environment. The enzymes that give fresh garlic its sharpness break down. These conditions also facilitate the Maillard reaction, the chemical process that produces wild new flavor compounds responsible for the deep taste of seared meat and fried onions.

Black garlic’s flavor is described as tasting like aged balsamic, prunes, licorice, molasses, caramel, and tamarind. Use the cloves as you would roasted garlic. Purée with olive oil for a dense and sweet flavor all its own that compliments steaks, chicken, fish and seafood. Smear the paste on crostini or incorporate it into dressings. Use in a braise to intensify the umami-rich flavor of spare ribs. Add to soups, risotto, noodle and rice dishes, and cheese dips. Black garlic also pairs well with blue cheese.

Black garlic also comes in a dehydrated powder that is considered an umami pixie dust. Just sprinkle a bit of it on anything that begs for depth and earthiness.

Most likely you won’t find black garlic at your local neighborhood market, but some Whole Foods will carry it. I’m lucky enough to get mine at Kalustyan’s in New York City. You can certainly get it online at Amazon or other specialty online food sources.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2016 All Rights Reserved

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