Holidays

Baked Mini Doughnuts

November 14, 2019

This holiday season make these little no-fry doughnuts. They are an easy to make treat that can be enjoyed for breakfast or dessert.

Thanksgiving Side Dishes

November 4, 2019

Turkey is the center of attention at the Thanksgiving table, but the sides are just as important.

Cupcakes

September 5, 2019

Cupcakes are an adaptable fun treat that makes any occasion special.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Happy Independence Day

July 4, 2019

Happy Independence Day!

Simnel Cake

April 17, 2019

Simnel cake is a traditional English fruitcake eaten during the Easter season and has been eaten since medieval times. The cake is both a rich, sweet treat and a symbolic ritual. The fruit cake is topped with eleven marzipan balls to represent the eleven apostles of Christ, minus Judas.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Ease Into The New Year

January 2, 2019

Ease Into The New Year With Delicious Salads

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Noel

December 25, 2018

Noel has been in English since the 13th century as a forename and family name (e.g., Nuwel, Nuuel) for those born or baptized on Christmas or during the Christmas season. In the late 14th century, Nowel is used as an exclamation of joy in The Canterbury Tales (this usage remains only in Christmas carols). In the late 14th century alliterative poem Sir Gawain and the Green knight, Nowel meant “Christmas day, the feast of Christmas, Christmastide.” Middle English shows several spellings, e.g., Newel, Nouel, Nowelle, Nowel, all derived from Anglo-French, Middle French, and Old French forms (Nowel, Nowelle, Nouel, Noel), Noel in French. The spellings with 0 (e.g., Noel) are a variant of spellings with a (e.g., Nael) that began in the 12th century. Nael is a regular French development from Latin natalis (in full, dies natalis “birthday”).

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

Christmas Cookies

December 22, 2018

Christmas Cookies That Are Almost Too Pretty To Eat

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

Share Time With Loved Ones

December 20, 2018

As family members return home, the time has come to gather to share precious time together.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

How To Cook Almost Any Roast

December 19, 2018

We at Tiny New York Kitchen get it! Especially during the holidays you don’t want to ruin a good piece of meat. Here are some general guidelines for producing the best results for your holiday meal.

Remove meat from the refrigerator at least an hour before roasting so it can come closer to room temperature.

Start the roast at 450 degrees for 15 minutes to develop a nice crust.

Drop the oven to 350 degrees for an additional 15 to 20 minutes per pound.

Remember, you must cook to temperature, NOT time, because every oven and piece of meat is unique. So, take the temperature of the roast every 20 to 30 minutes to avoid overcooking. 120 degrees (50C) for rare and 130 degrees (55C) for medium-rare.

Always use a meat thermometer. An instant-read probe thermometer helps dispel any guesswork.

Remove from oven and loosely cover roast with foil to keep warm and rest it for 30 minutes. Don’t be alarmed when you see the temperature of the roast creep upwards a few degrees while it rests. This is perfectly normal and expected.

These directions will work for nearly all holiday roasts. The exceptions are thinner/smaller roasts like beef tenderloin or rack of lamb. These can be cooked at 400 degrees for the entire time, using a meat thermometer to monitor progress.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

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