Weekend Fun

Peach Lime Marmalade

August 27, 2016

I had a bowlful of organic peaches ripening fast and a lime rolling around in the refrigerator and wondered how this combination would taste together. This morning was the first time that I tried it on toast and I am surprised at how delicious it is. I think that I’ll try making more over the weekend.

Pack Your Omelet Full Of Goodness

July 22, 2013

Cooking OmeletPack Your Omelet Full Of Goodness

Omelets are one of those dishes that you can have for breakfast, lunch or dinner.  The versatile omelet is low in calories too especially if you start with one egg and two egg whites (about 100 calories).  Add the fillings of your choice and you have a protein packed meal that will satisfy your hunger.

Cheese Choices

Choose 1/4 cup of one of these cheese for your omelet.

Shredded Swiss

Shredded Cheddar

Crumbled Feta

Vegetables

Choose as many vegetables as you want because they are full of fiber and low in calories.

Chopped Broccoli

Sliced Mushrooms

Chopped Tomatoes

Proteins

Choose1/4 cup of these delicious proteins.

Smoked Salmon

Turkey Bacon

Ham

Optional

Choose one of these for a total treat.

Sautéed Potatoes

Avocado

Crème Fraiche

 

All-American Hot Dogs

June 10, 2013

Hot DogsAll-American Hot Dogs

Summer is here and why pay top dollar going out when you can make delicious hot dogs at home?  Here is a guide to the different ways Americans make their frankfurters around the country.  I had the Sonoran style hot dogs while I was in Tucson in February and absolutely loved them.

 

New York Style

Served with brown or German mustard and sauerkraut or onions cooked in tomato paste.

 

Chicago Style

Served on a poppy seed bun with mustard, pickle relish, sport peppers, onions, tomatoes, dill pickles and celery salt.  Pepperoncini can be substituted for sport peppers.

 

Kansas City Style

Served on a sesame seed bun with brown or German mustard, sauerkraut and Swiss cheese.

 

Atlanta “Dragged Through The Garden” Style

Serve topped with coleslaw.

 

Detroit “Coney” Style

Served with chili, onions, mustard and cheddar cheese.

 

Seattle Style

Served with cream cheese and grilled onions.

 

Phoenix/Tucson “Sonoran” Style

Served as a bacon-wrapped hot dog with pinto beans, onions, tomatoes, mustard, mayo, jalapeno peppers and cheese.

 

Austin “Tex-Mex” Style

Served with queso, guacamole and crushed tortilla chips.

 

San Francisco “Wine Country” Style

Served with red wine caramelized onions and goat cheese.

 

Miami “Cuban” Style

Served with mustard, pickles and Swiss cheese.

 

Sonoran Hot Dogs Wrapped In Bacon On The GrillSonoran Hot Dogs Ready To Eat

Mother’s Day Brunch

May 10, 2013

Mother's Day FlowersMother’s Day Brunch

Put mom in a good mood this Sunday and make Mother’s Day a special day with a memorable brunch.  When my children were younger they often made me breakfast in bed for Mother’s Day.  They made me promise to stay in bed propped up on pillows while they wobbled trays of pancakes, sausage, fresh juice and chopped fruit to my bed. These breakfasts made by little hands were so sweet. They were so proud of themselves that they would hop up on my bed all smiles asking if they each could have a sausage or piece of bacon.  Before I knew it they would eat my entire “breakfast in bed.”

Eggs Benedict

Mother’s Day Scramble

Eggs Florentine With Waffles & Hollandaise

 

Pecan Pancakes

Lemon Curd French Toast

 

Melon Balls

Mixed Berries With Crème Fraiche

Raspberry Parfaits With Yogurt & Granola

 

Cherry Pecan Scones

Cherry Almond Quick Bread

 

Roasted Tomatoes

Hash Browns With Fresh Chives

Sweet Potato Hash Browns

 

Smoked Sausage

Smoked Bacon

Smoked Salmon

 

Freshly Brewed Coffee or Tea

Fresh Squeezed OJ

Fresh Squeezed Grapefruit Juice

Mother’s Day Mimosas

Citrus Spritzers

Bloody Marys

Saint Patrick’s Day Breakfast

March 16, 2013

Saint Patrick’s Day Breakfast

How lucky we are this year that Saint Patrick’s Day falls on the weekend so how about having a traditional full Irish breakfast.

Start with traditional bangers and then choose either Canadian bacon or double hickory smoked bacon.  Add Eggs, grilled tomatoes, soda bread, baked beans and coffee or Irish breakfast tea.   You can top your grilled tomatoes with grated cheese and herbs or have them just grilled.  Your eggs can be fried, poached or scrambled. 

Bangers are the cornerstone of the traditional full Irish breakfast.  Irish loin bacon is very similar to Canadian bacon as both are cut from the pork loin and are fairly lean meats.  They are cured and not smoked.  Irish bacon also has a small bit of tail meat connected to the eye of the loin.  Double hickory smoked bacon is very similar to American bacon or what is called streaky bacon in the British Isles.  This type of bacon comes from the pork belly and is easily distinguished by the stripes of lean and fat that run through it.  Double hickory smoked bacon is a fine substitute if you decide not to use Canadian bacon. 

Irish breakfasts vary from cook to cook and region to region by incorporating local specialties. Some regional favorites include mashed potatoes that are fried with leftover vegetables, blood sausage or sautéed mushrooms. 

Butter Cookies

November 24, 2012

Butter Cookies

It’s time to start thinking about making Christmas cookies. 

1 1/2 Cups Softened Butter

1 1/2 Cups Sugar

2 Eggs Lightly Beaten

3 Cups Unbleached Flour

1/3 Teaspoon Kosher Salt

1/2 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract

1/4 Cup Sifted Powdered Sugar (Optional)

Cookie Press

Preheat your oven to 375° F.  In a large size bowl cream the butter and sugar together.  Add the beaten eggs.  In a separate bowl mix the flour and salt.  Gradually add the flour mixture to the sugar mixture.  Blend well and then add the vanilla.  Fill the cookie press with 1/4 of the cookie dough at a time.  Press the cookies onto a parchment paper covered cookie sheet 2 inches apart.  Bake for 10 minutes.  Remove from the oven and allow the cookies to cool for 10 minutes while still on the cookie sheet.  Transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely.  Dust with the powdered sugar if you want to.  Makes 48 cookies. 

Packing A Picnic & Serving Food Outdoors

September 3, 2012

Packing A Picnic & Serving Food Outdoors

Packing A Picnic

*Pack lots of extra drinks in a cooler.  When it’s hot outside picnickers get thirsty.

*Pack sweet treats.  Bring fresh fruit such as berries and melon or cookies instead of ice cream.

*Keep prepared foods in the refrigerator until it is time to pack them up. 

*Bring a soccer ball, football, baseball & mitts or a Frisbee.  If you live close to the park either walk, rollerblade or ride your bikes. 

*Pack sunscreen!  Even when it is overcast or if you’re lying in the shade make sure to wear sunscreen.

Serving Food Outdoors

*When taking foods on a picnic make sure to keep perishables in the cooler with either ice or freezer packs until serving time.  Make sure that the food is cold BEFORE it goes into the cooler. 

*Pack just the right amount that you and your picnickers are going to eat.  You don’t want to bring leftovers back home.

*If you are driving to your picnic don’t put your cooler and picnic basket in the hot trunk.  Instead transport your picnic in the air-conditioned car.

*At you picnic site, keep the cooler and picnic basket in the shade.  Open the cooler as little as possible. 

*Never leave foods at room temperature for more than 2 hours.  If the temperature outside is over 90°F, perishable foods should be left out no longer than 1 hour.

*If you buy a lot of take-out foods, such as fried chicken or barbecued beef, make sure to eat the food within 2 hours of pickup.  Otherwise, buy the food in advance, refrigerate and reheat just before serving. 

*Keep desserts made with whipped cream, cream cheese or dairy products refrigerated until you are ready to serve.  Store any leftovers in a refrigerator or cooler. 

*When preparing food outdoors, away from home, make sure to bring a jug of water, soap and paper towels for hand washing.

My Birthday Picnic Basket

September 3, 2012

Birthday Picnic Basket

My Birthday Present! I have wanted a decked out picnic basket for years! One of my favorite things to do is travel around the U.S. and Europe packing little picnics. Now I can do it in style!

Today is Labor Day and I am going on a picnic with my new picnic basket.

The menu is:

Fried Chicken

https://www.tinynewyorkkitchen.com/olympic-fried-chicken/

 

Green Olives

Boston Baked Beans

https://www.tinynewyorkkitchen.com/boston-baked-beans/

 

Picnic Perfect Pasta Salad

https://www.tinynewyorkkitchen.com/picnic-perfect-pasta-salad/

 

Fresh Blueberry & Mango Cake

https://www.tinynewyorkkitchen.com/fresh-blueberry-mango-cake/

 

New Canaan Farmers’ Market

July 8, 2012

New Canaan Farmers’ Market

I love going to farmers' markets, especially good ones. It's the closest to "farm to table" that I can get without growing my own fruits and vegetables.  Yesterday was my first visit to the New Canaan farmer’s market.  It’s a good one!  I picked up beets, radishes, tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, peaches and plums.  Everything looked great and even though the vendors were busy they were very friendly and seemed happy to be there.

New Canaan Farmers’ Market

Saturday 10am to 2pm

May 12th Through October

Old Center School Parking Lot

South Avenue & Maple Street

www.newcanaanfarmersmarket.net

 

 

A Note About Grilled Steaks

July 1, 2012

A Note About Grilled Steaks

Steak is perfect for the grill.  A well marbled, cut thin and flat steak is made for searing over a bed of hot coals.  A grilled steak is mouthwatering if it is brown and crisp on the outside and pink & juicy on the inside.  There really isn’t an easier and less complicated dinner than a grilled steak with a green salad on the side.  Plus, the cleanup is practically effortless.  Most any cut of steak is great for grilling.  The classics are rib eye, New York, filet, tenderloin and porterhouse.  The lesser cuts are cheaper and usually every bit as tasty if they are marinated.  A flatiron, chuck, skirt steak, hangar steak, top sirloin or tri-tip are lesser cuts of steak that I tend to marinate overnight.  Steaks can be grilled as a single portion or larger steaks can be grilled whole and sliced for more than one.  A steak is best cut 1 to 2 inches thick.  If a steak is thinner, then the inside will be overdone before the outside is properly seared.  If a steak is thicker then the outside, it will start to char before the inside is ready.  Trim off all but a fourth of an inch layer of fat.  The less dripping fat means fewer flare-ups. 

 

Seasoning a steak is simple.  All you really need is kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Some people like an herb crust.  Chopping fresh herbs together in any combination is great.  You can combine thyme, rosemary, oregano and/or oregano; however, you should always use rosemary.  Mix the fresh herbs with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper.  Rub onto the steak with some olive oil an hour or so before grilling.  You should take the steaks out of the refrigerator about 1 hour before grilling to allow the steaks to come to room temperature.

 

Clean your grill with a wire brush and then prepare a hot fire.  Oil the grill and put on the steaks. Your grill should be so hot that you shouldn’t be able to tolerate the heat for more than a couple seconds.   Cook for 5 to 6 minutes.  Turn the steaks over and cook for another 5 to 6 minutes.  If your steak has a border of fat then turn this onto the grill by holding the steak up with your tongs.  Sear the fat for 1 to 2 minutes.  After you flip your steaks you should start checking for doneness after about 2 minutes.  Press the back of your tongs into the steak.  If it is rare it will be soft.  If it springs a bit then it is medium rare.  If it is resilient then it is well done.  Keep testing by using the “back of the tong” method.  You can check by cutting into the steaks, but I really think that it is better not to cut into the steaks.  Keep working on the “back of the tong” method and you will become a good judge pretty quickly.  I think that it is a good idea to take the steaks off of the grill when they are a little less done than you want them to be.  They will continue to cook while they rest.  A 1 inch steak will be grilled rare in about 8 minutes and for medium it should take about 12 minutes.  Check your fire while the steaks are cooking.  Move the coals as needed to make the fire hotter or cooler.  If your fire flares up then move the steaks out of the flames right away or the fire will burn up your steak.  This will form a black and acrid crust.  When you remove your steaks from the grill let them take a little rest for a few minutes before serving.  Resting stabilizes the internal juices so that they don’t run out excessively when you cut into the steaks.  If you are not going to serve right away, make sure to cover loosely with aluminum foil to help keep warm.  Don’t seal tightly or they will continue to cook. 

Happy Grilling!

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