Tarragon

Seasoning Suggestions

January 6, 2019

To flavor your food reach for herbs and spices rather than high-sodium table salt. Make sure to read the labels of seasoning mixes because many of them contain salt.

Seasoning Suggestions

Pasta: Basil, Fennel, Garlic, Paprika, Parsley, Sage
Potatoes: Chives, Garlic, Paprika, Parsley, Rosemary
Rice: Cumin, Marjoram, Parsley, Saffron, Tarragon, Thyme, Turmeric
Seafood: Chervil, Dill, Fennel, Tarragon, Parsley
Vegetables: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Dill, Marjoram, Mint, Nutmeg, Oregano, Paprika, Rosemary, Savory, Tarragon, Thyme

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

A Favorite St. Patrick’s Day Dish

March 17, 2018

It’s that time of year again, in America, when the beer turns green and the aroma of corned beef and cabbage fills the air. The dish is so comforting, but just what is corned beef? The term has nothing to do with corn, but was the English term for a small granule, such as a grain of salt. In days before modern refrigeration, salting meat was a way to preserve it and keep it from spoiling.

Corned beef is an Americanized addition to the traditional Irish diet. While colcannon (boiled potatoes, cabbage, and leeks in buttermilk flavored with wild garlic) was a common Irish dish, as was brown soda bread, corned beef was produced primarily for export to England. Upon arriving in America, however, it’s thought the Irish chose to celebrate their holiday with food that was typically not available to them in their home country, so corned beef was added to the menu, as was white soda bread studded with currants and caraway.

Corned beef is typically made from beef brisket, which is a cut of meat from the breast or lower chest, but the rump, bottom round, and even tongue, can be used. In America, the term “corned beef” is used to describe both the cured meat and the canned stuff found on grocery store shelves. In Britain, they call the canned stuff “salt beef.”

To make corned beef the meat is simmered in a blend of corned beef spices that usually include peppercorns, garlic, mustard, tarragon, thyme, parsley, cloves, and nutmeg.

In New England, you most often see corned beef served as a St. Patrick’s Day main dish or in a sandwich. As the main ingredient in New England Boiled Dinner, corned beef often pairs with potatoes, carrots, turnips, and cabbage in a hearty, savory, brothy bowl of goodness. When used in a sandwich, the most popular corned beef sandwich is the Reuben. Considered the quintessential Jewish deli sandwich, a Reuben is toasted rye bread stuffed with hot slices of corned beef, usually piled high, and topped with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and either Russian or Thousand Island dressing.

In New England, a frequent point of interest is also whether you prefer red vs. gray corned beef. The difference is “Red” brisket is cured with nitrite, which gives the meat its signature color. “Gray” corned beef, which is considered the authentic New England variety, is not cured with nitrate, so color forms naturally as it brines.

If you have corned beef leftovers a New England favorite is corned beef hash, which is typically served for breakfast.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

Winter Citrus Fruit

February 1, 2018

Winter Citrus Fruit is a beautiful natural ingredient that will perk up the winter table with generous juiciness and vibrant vivacious hues. Citrus fruit have a beauty that cooks can incorporate into their winter meals. As an added bonus they are an excellent snack for that nagging sweet tooth. They can bring a bit of glamor to a winter fruit salad. Arrange oranges, clementine, mandarin, pomelo or grapefruit slices and you will have a sunny rainbow of goodness for breakfast or brunch. Nothing more is needed than perhaps a scattering of fresh mint or basil. These citrus also combine well with cranberries, raspberries and strawberries, adding burst of sunshine to yogurt bowls and smoothies.

Green salads love a bit of sunshine, too. Add citrus slices to a mixture of arugula, radicchio, endive and baby kale; add minced fresh herbs, such as basil, tarragon and chill. Add a bit of creamy goat cheese and dress it all up with a vinaigrette.

The versatility of citrus makes them a superstar winter ingredient. These beautiful fruits are low in calories, have a significant amount of dietary fiber and are a nice source of folate. Rich in vitamin A and C, Citrus provides healing, soothing benefits for eyes, skin, hair, and nails and many positively impact the aging process. Consuming citrus may possibly lower the risk of heart disease, prostate cancer and macular degeneration.

Let the sunshine in!

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

Make The Most Of Cherries

July 17, 2017

I’ve been making the most of cherry season these days and sometimes have to get a bit inventive to use them to the fullest. Here are some ways to make the most of beautiful summer cherries.

Breakfast: Make quinoa and top with almond milk and cherries for a nourishing hot cereal bowl.

Lunch: Pick your favorite whole grain to make a salad with cherries, arugula, almonds, and tarragon.

Snacks: Blend almond milk, creamy almond butter, and cherries to make a delicious smoothie.

Dinner: Grill salmon and serve with couscous combined with cherries, green onions, and toasted almonds.

Dessert: Make a cherry crisp. You may want to throw in some dates or figs to give it a little extra heartiness.

Preserve: Make cherry jam, cherry syrup, or pickled cherries.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Freezing Herbs

April 26, 2017

Make prep a snap with herb ice cubes, ready to toss in the pan.

Freezing herbs is an excellent way of preserving fresh delicate herbs that cannot be successfully dried. They will lose their fresh appearance and texture, but are still suitable for use in cooking. They should keep for up to 3 months.

To freeze chopped herbs, half-fill ice cube trays with chopped herbs and top up with water. Freeze, and then remove the cubes from the tray and place in freezer bags.

To use, add the appropriate number of frozen cubes to soups, stews, and stocks. Heat until melted. A standard sized ice cube tray will hold about 1 tablespoon chopped herbs.

Alternately, pack chopped herbs in plastic containers and freeze. Sprinkle them directly into soups and stews.

To freeze whole sprigs or leaves, place in freezer bags, expel any air, tightly seal and freeze.

Alternately, open freeze whole sprigs or leaves on trays. When the herbs are frozen, transfer them carefully to freezer bags, expel any air, seal tightly and return to the freezer until ready to use.

Delicate herbs that cannot be dried successfully, but that are suitable for freezing, include: basil, chives, tarragon, chervil, coriander (cilantro), dill and parsley.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2017 All Rights Reserve

French Toast Toppings

April 2, 2016

French Toast Toppings

Ok, most of us love maple syrup on our pancakes and French toast, but sometimes it’s fun to change it up a bit. Here are some interesting alternatives that just may become your new favorites.

Apples & Thyme
Sauté 2 large Gala apples (cut into 1/2 inch thick pieces(, 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves and 1/4 teaspoon sugar in 2 tablespoons unsalted butter for 6 minutes until just tender.

Sweet & Spicy Bacon
Cook 1 pound bacon (cut into 1/2 inch pieces) in large-size skillet over a medium heat 10 minutes until nearly crisp. Using a slotted spoon transfer bacon to plate lined with paper towels. Wipe out skillet. Return bacon to skillet and cook 1 minute. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon brown sugar and cook, tossing, until sugar melts. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons maple syrup and sprinkle with 1/8 teaspoon cayenne. Toss to coat.

Herbed Goat Cheese
In bowl combine 4 ounces goat cheese (at room temperature), 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon and 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, 1 teaspoon lemon zest, and 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2016 All Rights Reserved

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