Peaches

In Season Stone Fruit

July 16, 2019

Stone fruit is at its peak during the summer.

Look for fruit without any bruises, cuts, or soft spots.

Peaches bruise easily – hold in the palm of your hand to check ripeness instead of squeezing.

Give a sniff. Ripe fruit has a fragrant scent that makes you want to take a bit.

Ripen peaches by storing in a paper bag for 2 to 3 days at room temperature out of direct sunlight.

Keep cherries in the refrigerator.

All stone fruits offer good-for-you fiber and antioxidants.

Stone fruits are low in calories.

Peaches are a great source of vitamins A and C.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Strawberry Peaches & Cream Cake

October 10, 2018

We love autumn, but we’re giving it one last-ditch effort to savor the remaining glimmers of summer. You may frost this cake or leave it plain.

Cherry ? Peach ? Jam

April 29, 2017

It’s Jam Making Time Again!

September

September 16, 2016

September

September is a wonderful time for enjoying the beautiful array at local farmers’ markets. September is a delightful time for gathering ingredients that will showcase fleeting flavors of summer. A walk among colorful baskets filled with fresh produce is incredibly inspiration.

Blazing scarlet tomatoes, sun-sweetened and fattened from their time on the vine, are joined by zesty green, bright yellow, and almost purple-colored varieties. Turn this beautiful rainbow into a final summer tomato salad by simply cutting thick slices of each colorful variety of tomato, and arranging them on a big platter. Drizzle the slices with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, sprinkle with a bit of sea salt, and finish the dish with finely minced basil.

Fill your shopping cart with crisp cucumbers, glossy purple or creamy white eggplant, pale green or buttery yellow summer squashes, string or wax beans, spicy jalapeno peppers, fragrant peaches, lush melons, sugary corn on the cob and great bunches of finely scented fresh herbs.

As September evenings grow quietly cooler, take pleasure in preparing dishes that feature these ingredients, such as nutmeg-scented roasted peaches, a delectable eggplant parmesan, velvety corn soup, garlic string beans or summer squash stuffed with ground lamb or turkey, breadcrumbs, fresh basil, oregano and parsley, cinnamon and bit of cheese. Cucumbers can be turned into simple refrigerator pickles, jalapeños can be roasted on the grill and packed away in the freezer, ensuring that a bit of summer will still be served as the season marches on.

There is also a hint of fall to be found at the farmers’ market. While all of the summer crops are still available to be savored, the new season is sneaking in. Freshly dug potatoes, dark purple plums, crisp early apples, succulent pears, Brussels sprouts, earthy mushrooms, carrots, cauliflower and kale will provide culinary creativity for weeks to come.

Cooking and eating with the seasons is the most excellent and efficient way to introduce high quality nutrients into the body. When we enjoy what nature has prepared for us, we are giving our bodies the gift of exceptionally luscious flavor, along with important healing properties. I can’t think of a better way to prepare a delicious life.

www.tinynewyorkkitchen.com

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2016 All Rights Reserved

5 Ways To Use A Vegetable Peeler

September 13, 2016

5 Ways To Use A Vegetable Peeler

The humble vegetable peeler has hidden talents.

Easily Peel Fruit: To peel soft fruits and vegetables, like tomatoes and peaches, you usually have to briefly dunk them into boiling water. Using a good vegetable peeler is so much easier and faster. Look for peelers with serrated blades for the best results and select not-too-ripe fruit.

Shaved Cheese: Give salads, pastas and roasted vegetables a restaurant-style finish by garnishing with generous amounts of shaved Parmesan or pecorino romano cheese.

Vegetable Pasta: Shave long strips of zucchini, carrots (even sweet potatoes and squash) to transform them into pasta substitutes. Serve raw or briefly steamed with your favorite sauce, or toss with a vinaigrette for a fresh and nutritious salad.

Spreadable Butter: Is there anything worse than trying to butter toast or bread with rock hard butter straight from the fridge? Use a vegetable peeler to scrape off thin and perfectly spreadable butter ribbons.

Chocolate Curls: Peel the edge of a slightly softened chunk of chocolate to create curls, or the flat surface of very cold chocolate to make shavings. Keep your creations in the freezer and use to garnish cakes, pies, puddings and seasonal fruit.

www.tinynewyorkkitchen.com

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2016 All Rights Reserved

Peach Lime Marmalade

August 27, 2016

I had a bowlful of organic peaches ripening fast and a lime rolling around in the refrigerator and wondered how this combination would taste together. This morning was the first time that I tried it on toast and I am surprised at how delicious it is. I think that I’ll try making more over the weekend.

Peach Lime Jam

August 21, 2016

I Love Experimenting In The Kitchen. Today I’m Trying Out A New Jam Combination. I Think That Peach & Lime Just Might Make A Delicious Jam.

Upside Down Peach Cake

August 12, 2016

It’s Hotter Than Blazes Out Today And For Some Reason I’ve Been In The Mood To Make An Upside Down Peach Cake. Actually, I Lied. I Made Two!

How To Pick A Peach

May 9, 2016

Because peaches can grow in most of the United States, as long as they’re in season (May through early October) chances are you’ll be able to find organic peaches near you. Look for peaches with flesh that yields slightly to subtle pressure without bruising. Another good indicator of ripeness is the fruit’s background color, behind the red highlights. For yellow peaches (the more tart variety), the background should be a deep gold; for milder white peaches, give them a sniff – they should have a rich, sweet fragrance.

“Work With What You Got!

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2016 All Rights Reserved

Buttermilk

April 14, 2016

In the old days, buttermilk was what was left in the butter churn. Nowadays, it’s manufactured with healthy bacteria much like yogurt. Buttermilk is made with very little fat or none at all. Either way, it adds a nice fresh tang and texture to baked goods. In the summer it’s nice to purée peaches with a little sugar, add buttermilk, and freeze in an ice cream maker to create a healthy low-fat homemade version of frozen yogurt. Buttermilk will keep for several weeks in the coldest part of your refrigerator.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2016 All Rights Reserved

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